August 2022: Call to Action, Let’s Fix the Harm!

Fix the Current Harm from 450,000 Sea-Tac Flights

It has been almost a year since El Centro de la Raza started an Environmental Justice Organizing and Education training with the Plaza Roberto Maestas and El Patio residents that aims to develop and promote environmental justice leadership, education, and community organizing within the Latino Community. The program includes topics such as the environmental justice movement, climate change, air and noise pollution, community organizing and more! Through the program, we aim to enable and empower our community to act as leaders and influence policy makers to improve environmental and health outcomes for Beacon Hill residents as they are disproportionately impacted by surrounding airports and major roadways causing air and noise pollution.

Beacon Hill is surrounded by major roadways where aircraft fly over us on average every 90 seconds causing air and noise pollution that lead to health impacts such as asthma, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, and other ailments. Noise pollution can lead to higher stress levels, less sleep, poorer cardiovascular health, and reduction in learning capabilities in youth. Yet our community, which is made up of primarily people of color, refugees, and immigrants, are not eligible for mitigation. Mitigation efforts can include funding for double panned windows to reduce the indoor noise, or more tree canopy to help filter and reduce air and noise pollution. Where you live, your income, race or language ability shouldn’t determine how healthy you are. However, the reality is that as low-income people of color, people are likelier to be disproportionately harmed by environmental issues.

Thirty community members from El Patio & Plaza Roberto Maestas have completed the Environmental Justice and education training with El Centro de la Raza. Through community organizing and leadership community members have come together as an important part of the fight against the exacerbated threat of air and noise pollution from the proposed Sea-Tac Airport Sustainable Air Master Plan (SAMP).

Through our Environmental Justice and Education Program, participants gained the knowledge and tools to make their voices heard as they fight for environmental justice for their families, friends, and community, including through story telling. Participants have expressed their concern in the added harm that SAMP will bring to their communities as flights are slowly increasing to pre-COVID flight numbers.

Community member Sandra Santos has expressed her concern in the increased flights as she is now aware of the health impacts it has on her family, especially her daughter who suffers from depression and is beginning to show symptoms of asthma. Santos is also aware of the climate impacts that aircraft aviation emissions will account for 25% of the global carbon budget by 2050. Forest fires is an additional concern Santos is worried will continues to worsen if nothing is done about the Climate Crisis. Santos fights for environmental justice for the health and future of her daughter as she wants a cleaner and sustainable world for her daughter.

Participants have continued to be involved after completing the EJ Training course by helping collects signatures for the Fix the Current Harm letter of concern that will be included in the comments to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) about the SeaTac Airport service expansion. El Centro de la Raza is continuing to organize more community members to participate in the Environmental Justice & Education program to continue to grow the movement. To support airport-impacted communities sign and share the letter of concern to help reach our goal of 4,000 signatures.

Food Bank Innovations to meet the moment

At El Centro de la Raza, we meet our community where the community needs us.  Like any organization facing new challenges, the moment called for innovation when the pandemic hit. Food insecurity was on the rise, especially for our elderly on fixed incomes as prices rose and it was no longer safe for them to gather at our food bank.

As our supporters may recall, before we had a grocery store model. The community would select and gather what they needed on the ground floor of the historic building. It was a time many socialized and connected to their own cultures through food, as so many of us do.

But as the pandemic surged, many in our community started to fear for their health. Some who were immunocompromised feared even leaving their homes. Their need for food never declined, and in fact rose because the prices for basic staples soared, so we had to act fast and keep both the community and our staff safe.

We decided to move to a walking version of a “drive-through” model.  We moved our food bank to the basement where our senior lounge once was and transformed it into our staging and distribution grounds to assemble prepacked, nourishing grocery bags for pickup.  All staff wore masks to stay safe and we encouraged our clients to also do so to keep one another safe. 

Once we completed the assembly of these prepacked bags, we handed the bags to clients through an outside window, where our clients would meet us in a line, wearing masks, and keeping six feet of distance between each other to gather their groceries.  This pickup continues and takes place Thursdays and Fridays between 10:00AM – 12:00PM and 2:00PM – 4:00PM every week.

The next challenge we faced was that many of our clients feared leaving their homes due to COVID-19. In fact, most of our clients are vulnerable and over 60 years old.  To address this need, we started home deliveries on Wednesdays.

Once vaccines and boosters became more widely available, we saw more of our elderly feel safe enough to resume visiting our food bank in-person.  We also started to host vaccine clinics at our Seattle and Federal Way offices as often as possible. 

While we are glad to see a degree of stabilization in FY2022 from the initial fear in the community regarding the pandemic, inflation has caused new problems.  Prices have spiked for gas, rent, supplies and food, while people in our elderly community continue to do their best on the same fixed incomes.  Each bag costs more to assemble. Our food bank food demands are getting higher for more fresh produce items and protein as well as we become more of the primary source for some in our community. We try our best to order them as much as we can, but these are items our clients articulate a greater need for more than before. 

While demands grow among our clients, we are also seeing new clients, as a result of the rising costs of food. We will continue to welcome anyone who needs help without zip code restrictions for as long as we can.  We are here to serve and represent our Beloved Community and gladly share what has worked to meet their evolving and growing needs.

Returning Over a Quarter of a Million Dollars in Stolen Wages

The seven-year partnership with the City of Seattle Office of Labor Standards has allowed El Centro de la Raza to recover over $300,000 in wages for our Spanish-speaking workers in the community.  In 2022, we have recovered $40,000 already.

Through our Work Center, we are able to speak daily to workers who call in, and to deliver Know Your Rights (KYR) trainings to ensure workers are informed about Seattle labor standards.  We teach about local Seattle laws, state laws, federal laws, and workplace injuries.

In our community, Spanish-speaking workers suffer higher rates of labor violations in Seattle/King County. The two labor laws we see most frequently violated are wage theft and lack of paid sick time.

Our continuous partnership with Seattle Office of Labor Standards gives us hope and energy for the future. The impact that this work has on the community goes far beyond numbers and money. We focus on assuring dignity, respect and a better quality of life for all workers.

We hope to continue to expand our program to reach and empower workers to be able to defend themselves against the exploitation of their labor.

Good news in efforts to expand affordable housing into Columbia City!

On July 21, Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, who authored JumpStart legislation, announced $80 million in JumpStart housing awards that will fund projects creating or preserving 1,769 homes. Mosqueda stressed that these 20 projects coming online will follow community visions and meet community needs by including family-sized units and on-site services, such as daycares or education and job centers for youth who’ve experienced homelessness.

From those funds, El Centro de la Raza will receive funding for our Columbia City development, which will create 87 units for low-income families and individuals.

Events: August 2022

August 12, 2022: Somos Seattle Pride Celebration at El Centro de la Raza!

Everyone is invited free event to celebrate our 4th Annual Seattle Latinx Pride Festival! Let’s celebrate our LGBTQ and Latino/a/x identities

Acompañanos en el cuarto festival del Orgullo LGBTQ Latino! Ven celebrar el orgullo de la comunidad Gay, Lesbiana, Bi, Trans Latina.

ENTERTAINMENT, DANCING, FOOD, COMMUNITY RESOURCES/VENDORS & MUCH MORE! // ENTRETENIMIENTO, BAILE, COMIDA, BEBIDAS, RECURSOS COMUNITARIOS Y MUCHO MAS!

Event: 4th Seattle Latinx Pride Festival

Date: Friday, August 12, 2022

Time: 5:00 PM -10:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestas, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

August 13: Movie Night at El Centro! Noche de Pelicula!

El Centro de la Raza looks forward to our monthly market to support our local businesses and to host a movie night!

More information to follow as the date approaches in the link below!

Event: Noche de Pelicula y Mercado!

Date: Saturday, August 13, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestas, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

August 13: Vaccine Clinic

Date: Saturday, August 13, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Location: Centilia Cultural Center/ Plaza Roberto Maestas, 1660 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

August 14: 5th Seattle Urban Book Expo!

The Black and Brown Literary Get-Down returns to El Centro De la Raza on August 14th, 2022. Free fun in one of the largest BIPOC book celebrations in the area! Food, community and fun for all ages.

Event: 5th Seattle Urban Book Expo

Date: Sunday, August 14, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM  8:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestas, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

October 8: Reserve your tickets for our 5oth Anniversary Gala now!

Celebrate 50 triumphant years of El Centro de la Raza with us at our annual Building the Beloved Community Gala on October 8th, 2022. It has been an honor to spend the last half-century dedicating our work towards serving our community, and we have so many people that we are grateful to. We want to dedicate this momentous anniversary year to:

  • Pioneers of social change, including advocates for mutli-racial unity, shepherds of anti-war movements, local faith communities, volunteers, and activists
  • The people who originally occupied the old Beacon Hill school in the name of dignity and for a better life for the Latino community
  • Our generous supporters from all walks of life, who have made it possible for us to continue our work, from 1972 to this present day

It is an honor to still be here today providing critical services, life-changing opportunities, developing resiliency, and hope. We are so fortunate to not only be surviving, but thriving, with all thanks due to our incredible community of supporters, donors, residents, and staff.

REGISTER HERE

Join us on Saturday, October 8, 2022 for our 50th Anniversary Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting live event that raises funds for vital programs and services that benefit more than 21,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening also includes the presentation of our Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Awards & Scholarships. Registration will become available later this year.

Please call (206) 957-4649 or email events@elcentrodelaraza.org for more information.

Take Action July 2022

What our representatives are doing to address health care workforce shortages and help immigrant workers

On June 7th, Representatives Adam Smith (D-Wash.) and Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.) introduced legislation to help alleviate health care workforce shortages across the country and reduce employment barriers for immigrants who want to work in the health care field. Here is a brief summary of the three bills that were introduced:

  • The Immigrants in Nursing and Allied Health Act would help immigrants, regardless of whether they have any previous health care experience, get the financial support they need to enter nursing and allied health careers including nursing, mental and behavioral health, and other health care professions.
  • The IMG Assistance Act would help reduce the barriers that international medical graduates face when trying to complete the necessary training and certification to receive a U.S. medical license.
  • The Professional’s Access to Health (PATH) Workforce Integration Act would offer training and counseling opportunities to internationally trained health professionals who are U.S. citizens, or immigrants legally residing in the U.S. while educating employers on the abilities and capacities of health professionals who have been educated overseas.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated national workforce challenges in health care. We must do everything we can to support health care workers, combat staffing shortages, and rebuild our health care system. One way we can do that is by reducing barriers to employment for immigrants looking to enter the health care field,” said Rep. Adam Smith. “Many immigrants, including those with international medical degrees, face significant costs and challenges to becoming health care professionals that deter them from entering the field. These bills will help reduce existing barriers and provide funding for training, licensing, certification, and case management services for immigrants in the U.S. to expand access to good-paying health care jobs and build a stronger health care workforce. Our country is in desperate need of more primary care physicians, nurses, behavioral health professionals, technicians, and other critical workers who care for our communities. There are many immigrants who are willing and able to fill these positions – these bills would take meaningful action to make these job opportunities a possibility for immigrants.”

“Healthcare provider shortages have created care deserts. This is unacceptable. At its current capacity, our nation’s infrastructure does not have the ability to supply a health professional workforce to fill the current and projected U.S. needs. At the same time, internationally educated health professionals already residing legally in the U.S., including physicians, nurses, dentists, mental health providers, pharmacists, social workers, and other health professionals, are currently working as childcare providers, home health aides, taxi drivers, laborers, and low-skilled jobs,” said Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard. “I commend my colleague, Representative Smith, for his leadership in addressing this issue and I am proud to be working with him to introduce these three bills that will reduce barriers to entry into the workforce for internationally educated health professionals. My bill, the “Professionals Access to Health Workforce Integration Act,” or PATH Act would help to create a pipeline for lawfully present foreign trained health professionals to enter the American workforce with employment matching their health professional skills, education, and expertise. By facilitating the integration of these internationally trained health professionals into the U.S. health workforce, we will help increase our nation’s workforce diversity and contribute to improvements in the quality and availability of care for underserved populations.”

More information about the bills and a list of endorsements can be found here.

Mark and share Voting Deadlines Washingtonians!

Get registered here: https://voter.votewa.gov/WhereToVote.aspx?org=ECDLR & add these dates to your calendar:

Primary election: Tuesday, August 2

  • Deadline to register online or by mail: Monday, July 25

General Election: Tuesday, November 8

  • Deadline to register online or by mail: Monday, October 31

Events: July- August 2022

August 12, 2022: Somos Seattle Pride Celebration at El Centro de la Raza!

Everyone is invited free event to celebrate our 4th Annual Seattle Latinx Pride Festival! Let’s celebrate our LGBTQ and Latino/a/x identities

Acompañanos en el cuarto festival del Orgullo LGBTQ Latino! Ven celebrar el orgullo de la comunidad Gay, Lesbiana, Bi, Trans Latina.

ENTERTAINMENT, DANCING, FOOD, COMMUNITY RESOURCES/VENDORS & MUCH MORE! // ENTRETENIMIENTO, BAILE, COMIDA, BEBIDAS, RECURSOS COMUNITARIOS Y MUCHO MAS!

Event: 4th Seattle Latinx Pride Festival

Date: Friday, August 12, 2022

Time: 5:00 PM -10:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestras, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

August 13: Movie Night at El Centro! Noche de Pelicula!

El Centro de la Raza looks forward to our monthly market to support our local businesses and to host a movie night!

More information to follow as the date approaches in the link below!

Event: Noche de Pelicula y Mercado!

Date: Saturday, August 13, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM  8:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestras, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

October 8: Reserve your tickets for our 5oth Anniversary Gala now!

Celebrate 50 triumphant years of El Centro de la Raza with us at our annual Building the Beloved Community Gala on October 8th, 2022. It has been an honor to spend the last half-century dedicating our work towards serving our community, and we have so many people that we are grateful to. We want to dedicate this momentous anniversary year to:

  • Pioneers of social change, including advocates for mutli-racial unity, shepherds of anti-war movements, local faith communities, volunteers, and activists
  • The people who originally occupied the old Beacon Hill school in the name of dignity and for a better life for the Latino community
  • Our generous supporters from all walks of life, who have made it possible for us to continue our work, from 1972 to this present day

It is an honor to still be here today providing critical services, life-changing opportunities, developing resiliency, and hope. We are so fortunate to not only be surviving, but thriving, with all thanks due to our incredible community of supporters, donors, residents, and staff.

REGISTER HERE

Join us on Saturday, October 8, 2022 for our 50th Anniversary Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting live event that raises funds for vital programs and services that benefit more than 21,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening also includes the presentation of our Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Awards & Scholarships. Registration will become available later this year.

Please call (206) 957-4649 or email events@elcentrodelaraza.org for more information.

June-July: Cuentos from Our Work

81 Students Graduate to Kindergarten from the José Martí Child Development Center

We are proud to announce that a total of 81 children successfully completed their final year of preschool and graduated from the José Martí Child Development Center! They are now prepared for their next adventure: kindergarten!

Though the ongoing pandemic posed many challenges, the children participated in dual-language programming and learned the skills to prepare them for kindergarten. They engaged with social justice and community involvement topics and made significant strides in social/emotional, physical, cognitive and linguistic development.

We are so thankful to all of our students, families, and community of supporters for their role in keeping our program running, and keeping our students safe and healthy. And mil gracias to Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP) and Seattle Preschool Program as well as the Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF) and City of Seattle subsidy programs that make it possible for many of our students to attend high quality, affordable preschool.

Finally, we just want to say another BIG congratulations to our graduates for a great year — our hope to each of you is that you will continue learning and continue to be proud of your cultures, languages and who you are. You and your families are always welcome at El Centro de la Raza, and we hope to see you all at future community and cultural events. We will miss you all and wish you the best of luck in kindergarten!

We Remember July 27th and Santos Rodriguez, Always

Before dawn of July 24, 1973, 12-year old Santos Rodriguez and his brother were taken from their home in Dallas to the back of a police vehicle at gunpoint by Officer Darrel Cain. With a gun pointed at Santos’ temple, the officer pulled the trigger once, warning both children that he would continue until he had the truth. Convinced they were both lying about robbing a soda machine, he pulled the trigger again, ending Santos life instantly.

At El Centro de la Raza, employees decided to name a park in his memory, the Santos Rodriguez Memorial Park, to remind us that we must continue to fight against racism for a better world for our children.

Henry Sanchez joins El Centro de la Raza

We are glad to introduce Henry Sanchez, our Ethnic Studies Aide who will be mentoring students at El Centro de la Raza. He is a first generation student who is currently a senior at University of Washington, majoring in Comparative Ethnic Studies with a minor in Sociology.

Henry first connected with El Centro when the landowners of the mobile home park in SeaTac where his family lived decided to sell its land and give long time residents a two week eviction notice. He and other kids and teens formed a Youth Committee, and the largely Hispanic mobile park neighborhood became activists. They put together a documentary to talk about why they loved where they lived and the community that was there. For many in Seattle, it is one of the last bastions of affordable housing. With such short notice, people who had poured all of their savings into their homes for decades were about to lose their houses–many of which were not structurally sound to move or had difficulty finding spaces in other parks.

With El Centro de la Raza’s support, Henry’s family was able to purchase another home in time. Like many families, Henry engaged with different programs to strengthen his household and today he is mentoring others to do the same. Welcome Henry!  

June-July 2022: Call to Action & News Affecting the Community

A signature to advance gun responsibility legislation to protect our families and future

From our partners at the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, tell Congress we need commitments to create enhanced background checks for gun buyers aged 18-21, address the dating partner loophole, crack down on gun trafficking, fund implementation of state Extreme Risk Protection Orders, and more. Sign here.

Want to get involved? See five ways below to prevent gun violence.

Mayor Harrell Statement on SCOTUS Abortion Ruling

Seattle – Today, Mayor Bruce Harrell released the following statement: 

“The Supreme Court’s decision is dangerous, outrageous, and an unacceptable step back for generations of women now and to come. Just yesterday, the Supreme Court limited states’ ability to regulate guns, but today declared states can regulate bodies. We know too many states will react quickly and severely to this ruling and we know the consequences of those efforts to restrict reproductive health care will be dire. 

“Maternal mortality will increase. Infant mortality will increase. Poverty will rise and positive health outcomes will decline. Women, transgender, and non-binary people will be forced to seek unsafe abortions. The implications of this decision will disproportionately impact women of color, who are already bearing the brunt of child care in this country. Where we can counter this, we must. Seattle will remain a place where we lead with reproductive justice and where abortion and reproductive health care are available to all who seek it. 

“More people will come to Seattle from out of state to seek safe and accessible reproductive care, which is why we’re responding to this unprecedented moment in our supplemental budget proposal. Our administration is seeking to invest $250,000 in efforts to expand access to reproductive health care through the Northwest Abortion Access Fund. 

“This will complement the City’s support for ongoing efforts led by Seattle-King County Public Health to link residents to reproductive health care through Community Health Partnership, School-Based Health Centers, Nurse-Family Partnership, and Mobile Medical Vans. 

“As states enact and engage in punitive and reactionary efforts to enforce this regressive assault on their constituents’ bodies, our Seattle Police Department will not participate in enforcing the criminal laws of other states that are inconsistent with Washington laws and values. 

“Men have an obligation to stand with the women in our country who have seen their constitutional rights eliminated. A decision like this makes hope difficult and threatens our most precious rights and liberties. However, in Seattle, we reject this decision – full stop – and will ensure our response is based in a united commitment to maintain and expand our city’s embrace of privacy, freedom, and shared values.” 

NALEO Educational Fund Urges Census Bureau to Release More Data on State and Local Undercounts

Census estimates revealed a severe and devastating 4.99 percent undercount of Latinos in Census 2020; detailed state and local data are critical to understanding and ameliorating the undercount’s impact on the community 

“With several factors likely contributing to the Latino undercount in the 2020 Census, it is imperative that the U.S. Census Bureau rebuilds its trust with the public by releasing data that provides insight into the severe undercount of the Latino community.”
– NALEO Educational Fund CEO Arturo Vargas


WASHINGTON, D.C. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund today called for the U.S. Census Bureau to provide data that would better illuminate the just-released Census 2020 state Post-Enumeration Survey (PES) results.  In March, the national-level PES results confirmed a severe 4.99 percent undercount of Latinos in Census 2020, a 3.3 percent undercount of Black residents, and a 2.79 percent undercount of very young children (ages 0–4). However, as the Bureau previously announced, today’s state estimates do not include demographic characteristics such as race and Hispanic origin and are not available for geographies below the state level.  This lack of detail raises more questions than answers about the accuracy of the 2020 Census.  

“With Latinos accounting for nearly one of every five U.S. residents, the PES estimates confirming the national undercount of Latinos is very alarming,” said NALEO Educational Fund CEO Arturo Vargas.  “We have urged the Bureau to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the impact of the undercount on the Latino community and the options to ameliorate it.  The Bureau must move forward with this undertaking transparently and in partnership with the full range of public and private stakeholders, including data experts, state and local governments, and community and civic leaders.  However, we cannot achieve this goal without relevant data on the undercount of Latinos by state and for different localities throughout the nation. 

“For example, New York City has a population larger than 40 states and Washington, D.C., and over one-fourth (28.3 percent) of the city’s 8.8 million residents are Latino.  Without additional undercount data, we will not be able to fully gauge the total severity of the Latino undercount within each state and in different parts of the nation.

“The PES state estimates do not tell the whole story of the accuracy of the 2020 Census count for different population groups or areas in the states.  For example, New York is the nation’s fourth most populous state, and the national undercounts suggest that large numbers of persons from population groups that make New York their home were missed in Census 2020.  However, the PES estimates are net figures derived in part from both the 2020 Census omissions and persons overcounted in the enumeration.  Thus, in the 3.44 percent net New York overcount, the persons overcounted in the state may mask the impact of the persons missed in enumeration and other significant problems with the overall accuracy of census data for New York.  

“Based on our work with and research on historically undercounted communities, we believe it is likely that Census 2020’s accuracy varied in different regions of the states.  For example, areas with large concentrations of Latinos, Black residents, and young children — such as the Boroughs of Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Queens — are likely to have had the highest undercounts, while places with large concentrations of non-Hispanic whites and wealthy residents — such as areas in Manhattan, Long Island, or upstate New York — likely had overcounts.

“However, without specific Latino undercount data and data on other New York population groups throughout the state, we cannot determine precisely where and to what extent these population groups were missed. 

“Data from the 2020 Census have already been used to apportion the U.S. House of Representatives and for redistricting, despite the considerable flaws in the number of Latinos.  In addition, unless the Bureau takes action to analyze and mitigate the impact of the undercount, these flawed data will now guide the distribution of more than $1.5 trillion in annual federal funding to states and localities based on an incorrect snapshot of our population.  Without reliable state-by-state data on the undercount for different population groups and localities, stakeholders cannot be fully engaged partners in the much-needed efforts to mitigate the effect of the undercounts on funding formulas and the fair allocation of resources.  These data will also enhance the ability of stakeholders to help the Bureau assess the impact of the undercounts on the enforcement of civil rights protections and other purposes for which census data are used.  Additionally, these data would also be invaluable for Census 2030 planning efforts. 

“We understand the Census Bureau’s position that the PES sample size is not adequate enough to produce data that meet the Bureau’s standards for every demographic group in each state or many localities in the nation.  Thus, we urge the Bureau to research and make available data from other sources that could help illuminate the accuracy of Census 2020 data for localities.  This research will also inform the Bureau’s work to ameliorate the impact of Census 2020 undercounts. 

“Ultimately, with several factors likely contributing to the national Latino undercount in the 2020 Census, the release of more detailed state and local data will also provide a crucial opportunity for the Bureau to rebuild its trust with the public.  The data would also enable stakeholders to work together with the Bureau on one of the toughest tasks it must undertake — making fundamental changes to how it counts the U.S. population in a manner that will significantly enhance the accuracy and fairness of the enumeration.”

Key Findings of the PES Data: PES Net Undercount Information – State The state net undercounts ranged from 1.92 percent in Texas to 5.04 percent in Arkansas. The states with undercounts include: Arkansas (5.04 percent) Florida (3.48 percent) Tennessee (4.78 percent) Mississippi (4.11 percent) Illinois (1.97 percent) Texas (1.92 percent)   PES Net Undercount Information – National The national PES data were the Census Bureau’s first official estimate of the accuracy of Census 2020.  It is a statistical analysis of a survey of the nation’s population.  Comparing the PES and Census 2020 data determines who was missed or counted in error in Census 2020. The PES data released in March revealed that Census 2020 undercounted 4.99 percent of the Latino population — 3.45 percentage points higher than the Census 2010 Latino undercount of 1.54 percent.  Moreover, the increase in this undercount is more than threefold from Census 2010. For the nation as a whole, the PES found a 1.64 percent overcount of those who identified exclusively as non-Hispanic white.   Youth Undercount Information  The PES did not provide an estimate specifically for Latino children or any children at the state and local level, and further statistical analysis is needed to illuminate 1.) the undercount of Latino children and 2.) where these undercounts occurred. At the national level, the PES revealed that Census 2020 undercounted 2.79 percent of very young children (ages 0–4), which is 2.07 percentage points higher than the Census 2010 undercount of this population group (0.72 percent).  The increase in this undercount is more than threefold from Census 2010. In 2016, research spearheaded by demographer Dr. William O’Hare found that the net undercount rate for very young Latino children ages 0–4 was 7.1 percent, compared to 4.3 percent for non-Latinos — with Census 2010 missing nearly 400,000 very young Latino children. Given that more than one out of every four American children are Latino, these figures represent a severe undercount of very young Latino children once again.

###About NALEO Educational Fund
NALEO Educational Fund is the nation’s leading non-profit, non-partisan organization that facilitates the full participation of Latinos in the American political process, from citizenship to public service.

June 2022 – Cuentos from Our Work

Felicidades to Graduates from El Centro de la Raza!!

Graduation is always an exciting time at El Centro de la Raza. From 8th grade promotion to high school graduation, scholars enrolled in our youth services programs are celebrating their accomplishments.

Latina/o Excellence is the main theme for the season. This year, all graduating scholars received a sarpe graduation stole, serving as a reminder that our cultures are part of our success.

For our middle school youth promotion, their graduation stole says ‘Class of 2026’. This is no error. Our hope is that this sash will serve as inspiration for them to reach high school graduation.

Inevitably the question comes up, what are you going to do next?

For Kimberly, a senior from Thomas Jefferson High School in Federal Way, the answer is, “Right now, I just want to live in this moment, soak in this celebration. There was a time that I didn’t know if we would have a ceremony, so just being able to walk the stage is a moment I want to remember forever!”

Our Work Study Program at El Centro de la Raza

The work at El Centro de la Raza would not be possible without the brilliant Work Study students from our community.  They bring a renewed sense of possibility and energy and rejuvenate organizations by bringing the latest research.

This last quarter, we benefited immensely from the relentless work of two Work Study partners in the field of Social Work who helped our development department.  They worked in our procurement efforts to secure gifts to auction for our major fundraising event, the Beloved Community Gala, and later they focused on supporting our communications efforts, to tell the stories of our work. 

Marla Perez and Juan Galvez, we are so grateful for your work and applaud your work in the community and the visions you hold for the community work you will continue to do! Congratulations on your graduation and attaining your Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Washington!

Juan Galvez

To Juan, El Centro de la Raza’s fifty years of work is “a testimony of real change, fueled by empathy and good will.”  El Centro’s work is not only about serving the community, it is the community.  For him, letting the multiracial, and especially the Latinx community, know what services are available to them was a big motivator for working with El Centro de la Raza. It also inspires Juan by showing him what is possible- his goal is to create a non-profit organization that supports immigrants in King County.

Juan was born and raised in Michoacán, Mexico and migrated to Washington when he was 16 years old. He attended high school at Lake Chelan, graduated from Western Washington University with a double major in Sociology & Spanish in 2018, and completes his Masters of Social Work at the University of Washington this June.

After graduation, he will be working for the Department of Children Youth and Families for the upcoming two years.  Thereafter, he will start working as a school social worker and plan the development of a non-profit organization that will support undocumented Latinx immigrants in King County.

Beyond his work, we asked Juan to tell us something that would surprise people about him.

“I am a singer and song writer that has music in all streaming platforms! I am also currently a part of a group called “Los Preferidos del Ejido,” a new project that includes multiple talented musicians from all over the state of Washington.”

Marla Perez

Marla chose to work at El Centro de la Raza because the organization is committed to serving and empowering the individuals and communities. She wanted to learn about the organization’s efforts and support in raising awareness about their services so that as many people as possible could access their programs and resources. 

“What I find to be really unique about ECDLR is that they take different approaches to address systemic issues causing inequality and oppression while simultaneously supporting the people impacted by it.  ECDLR takes a holistic approach to support their employees, community, and society and I truly admire all that they do.”

Marla was born in Compostela, Nayarit and raised in Bothell, WA by a single mother with the help of all her siblings. Her love for her mother, sisters, and family has given her the strength to work towards supporting her community and her family. She completed her Bachelor’s in Psychology with a minor in Spanish from Western Washington University, while working for C2C a mentoring initiative. After graduating, she worked as a sexual assault therapist at Consejo Counseling for two years. This June, she graduates with her Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Washington. 

In Marla’s experience, ECDLR encourages self-care, compassion, accountability, initiative, activism, respect, community, and empowerment. Those are all things she believes in and strives to incorporate into her own personal and professional life. Through her life experiences, she has realized the significant effects of the systemic and internalized racism in our society. She has also seen how much damage the lack of access to information, resources, and community can have on children, individuals, and families. Marla says, “I am now committed to empowering, supporting, and advocating for children and families who have experienced trauma and connecting them to the necessary information and appropriate services to promote their healing, stability, and success.” 

 Beginning this summer, Marla will be working for DCYF as a child and family welfare social worker. After completing her contract with them, she would like to eventually have her own practice serving survivors of trauma, specifically within the Latinx community. 

Something people might be surprised to know about Marla is that I travel every chance she gets! “After studying abroad in Spain when I was 19, I haven’t stopped. I loved Italy and would love to live there for a short period at some point of my life, maybe after a learn more of the language!”

Dental Health- A Community Effort

We would like to thank everyone for their partnership with this first event of the King County Adult Dental Program (KCADP) for our most recent dental clinic!

We scheduled 12 patients– the maximum we were allowed to schedule ahead of time! We had a total of 7 walk ins, four of which we were able to accommodate, and an additional three we referred to our public health dental clinics.

Folks were also enrolled into Apple Health (Medicaid), the Breast, Cervical, Colon Health Program (BCCHP) and distributed Orca Lift cards! We are grateful to volunteers and our community partners who made this possible!

Thank you once again.

Have a magnificent day!

Events: June – July 2022

July 16, 2022: Summer Market at El Centro de la Raza!

Come enjoy the summer with an outdoor market, local food vendors, and entertainment for the whole family! // Ven a disfrutar del verano con un mercado al aire libre, vendedores de comida locales, y entretenimiento para toda la familia!

Event: Summer Market // Mercado de Verano

Date: Saturday, July 16, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM  4:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestras, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

July 16, 2022: Somos Seattle Pride Celebration at El Centro de la Raza!

Everyone is invited free event to celebrate our 4th Annual Seattle Latinx Pride Festival! Let’s celebrate our LGBTQ and Latino/a/x identities

Acompañanos en el cuarto festival del Orgullo LGBTQ Latino! Ven celebrar el orgullo de la comunidad Gay, Lesbiana, Bi, Trans Latina.

ENTERTAINMENT, DANCING, FOOD, COMMUNITY RESOURCES/VENDORS & MUCH MORE! // ENTRETENIMIENTO, BAILE, COMIDA, BEBIDAS, RECURSOS COMUNITARIOS Y MUCHO MAS!

Event: 4th Seattle Latinx Pride Festival

Date: Saturday, July 16, 2022

Time: 5:00 PM -10:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestras, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

August 13: Movie Night at El Centro! Noche de Pelicula!

El Centro de la Raza looks forward to our monthly market to support our local businesses and to host a movie night!

More information to follow as the date approaches in the link below!

Event: Noche de Pelicula y Mercado!

Date: Saturday, August 13, 2022

Time: 10:00 AM  8:00 PM

Location: Plaza Roberto Maestras, 1650 S Roberto Maestas Festival Street, Seattle WA 98144

October 8: Reserve your tickets for our 5oth Anniversary Gala now!

Celebrate 50 triumphant years of El Centro de la Raza with us at our annual Building the Beloved Community Gala on October 8th, 2022. It has been an honor to spend the last half-century dedicating our work towards serving our community, and we have so many people that we are grateful to. We want to dedicate this momentous anniversary year to:

  • Pioneers of social change, including advocates for mutli-racial unity, shepherds of anti-war movements, local faith communities, volunteers, and activists
  • The people who originally occupied the old Beacon Hill school in the name of dignity and for a better life for the Latino community
  • Our generous supporters from all walks of life, who have made it possible for us to continue our work, from 1972 to this present day

It is an honor to still be here today providing critical services, life-changing opportunities, developing resiliency, and hope. We are so fortunate to not only be surviving, but thriving, with all thanks due to our incredible community of supporters, donors, residents, and staff.

REGISTER HERE

Join us on Saturday, October 8, 2022 for our 50th Anniversary Building the Beloved Community Gala and take part in an exciting live event that raises funds for vital programs and services that benefit more than 21,000 individuals and families across our region. The evening also includes the presentation of our Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Awards & Scholarships. Registration will become available later this year.

Please call (206) 957-4649 or email events@elcentrodelaraza.org for more information.

Upcoming Events – May-June 2022


Redistricting Discussions Resume

May 19, 2022 – In response to the drastic growth of Seattle since 2010 of 21.1%, the Seattle Redistricting Commission is currently examining how to redraw the boundaries of Seattle’s seven City Council Districts and is inviting community members to learn about the process and provide feedback at upcoming public forums. They are considering expanding boundary lines in District 1, 2, 5, and 6 and contracting Districts 3, 4, and 7.

This is an opportunity to present our concerns and ask questions about how redistricting can impact civic engagement, geographic boundaries, and waterways.

We will be hosting one at El Centro de la Raza, and invite you to register and join in person or virtually if you can.

Register in advance at https://seattle.surveymonkey.com/r/VXM2PGW.


District 2 Public Forum: May 19, 2022 from 5:30pm-7:30pm
Thursday, 19th of Mayo
5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
El Centro de la Raza, Centilia Cultural Center
1660 S Roberto Maestas Festival St, Seattle, WA 98144
In-Person or Virtual: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81813406544


Art for (Summer) Days with Beacon Arts!

June 11, July 9, Aug 13, Sept 10– Join us for sunny days filled with art, good company, and people showing love for plants and pop artists in the neighborhood at the Beacon Arts Street Fairs!

June 11| July 9 | Aug 13 | Sept

10:00AM- 4:00PM @ Roberto Maestas Festival Street


Two more weeks to nominate a Community Leader for the Roberto Maestas Legacy Award!


El Centro de la Raza turns 50 this year! Help us celebrate by nominating someone who is doing important Social Justice work in our community for the Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Award. The Legacy Awards are our way of honoring of our late founder, Roberto Maestas, who helped organize the 1972 peaceful occupation of the abandoned Beacon Hill school, which later became El Centro de la Raza as we know it today. Roberto Maestas’s life was dedicated to building “Beloved Community” through multi-racial unity. He deeply believed that poverty, racism and social inequity could only be eradicated if people of all races and backgrounds came together to do so.

The 12th Annual Roberto Felipe Maestas Legacy Award will recognize two individuals who have exemplified Building the Beloved Community through multi-racial unity and working to eliminate poverty, racism and social inequity. We encourage people of all races, ethnicities, ages, and gender identities to apply for this award. 
 
El Centro de la Raza will celebrate awardees and their contributions by making a $1,000 gift in their name to an organization of their choice.  Award recipients will be recognized at El Centro de la Raza’s 50th Anniversary Building the Beloved Community Gala, which is set to take place on Saturday, October 8, 2022.
 
Legacy Award applicants can self-nominate or be nominated by someone else. Recipients are asked to attend El Centro de la Raza’s Building the Beloved Community Gala.
 
Deadline for application submission is Tuesday, May 31, 2022 at 5:00pm Pacific Time. 

Please nominate yourself or someone you know today via our form.

Read about our 2021 honorees, Dr. Estell Williams and Edwin Lindo

The health and success of El Centro de la Raza begins with you. Support from a broad base of community members including foundations, individuals, and corporations is critical to our success and we ask that you carefully consider making a personally meaningful gift – it may be the largest gift you have ever made.

Pictures from Recent Events

For the first time since 2019, we were able to celebrate our culture with you all again in-person! Thank you to everyone who attended despite the chilly weather to dance, play, and support our local artists and vendors!

Please follow us on Facebook and Instagram for more coverage of our events, including pictures and videos from our events:

Facebook | Instagram | Our Event on Fox 13!